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Should I Eat Organic?

“Organic food is expensive.” I hear this comment daily when I speak with patients, colleagues and friends. Is it even possible to always eat completely organic?

In our daily lives, it is not always possible to make the best choices in terms of food. Nobody understands this better than an entrepreneur, chiropractor and owner of multiple businesses. We have hectic lives and if you have kids and parents to take care of, we can often feel like there just aren’t enough hours in the day to make great food at home on a daily basis. Choosing high quality foods when you grocery shop is also not easy, but it is possible if you know what to look for.

What does Organic even mean?

I’m sure we have all heard about the use of pesticides and genetically modified organism (GMO) crops that are growing in usage throughout North America especially.

Organic foods generally are foods that have not been genetically modified to withstand the effect of herbicide and pesticide sprays. Organic foods are those that have not been sprayed with pesticides and herbicides. The most commonly known example of this practice is the company Monsanto, which uses genetically modified seeds of corn, soybean and other crops, and sprays them with their own herbicide product called Roundup.

The main ingredient in Roundup is a chemical called Glyphosate. Glyphosate actively is used to kill weeds and grasses that compete for soil usage with crops that are being grown by farmers.

Glyphosate has been linked to many health conditions since its usage started in 1996 when glyphosate resistant crops were introduced in the US. The health conditions implicated include a nearly exact correlation with Autism, Alzheimer’s, Obesity, Diabetes and Autoimmune diseases. It is not unreasonable to assume that these chemicals could potentially be a significant source of chronic health conditions. For this reason, it would be best to purchase organic produce when you are shopping for groceries.

Do I need to buy everything Organic?

Some vegetables and crops have been found to contain more pesticide and herbicide than others. The Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org) has created a list of foods that are highest and lowest in pesticide and herbicide residues. They have called these lists the “Dirty Dozen” and the “Clean Fifteen”.

Dirty Dozen:

  • Apples
  • Celery
  • Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Peaches
  • Strawberries
  • Nectarines
  • Grapes
  • Spinach
  • Lettuce
  • Cucumbers
  • Blueberries
  • Potatoes

Clean Fifteen:

  • Onions
  • Sweet Corn
  • Pineapples
  • Avocado
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet Peas
  • Asparagus
  • Mangoes
  • Eggplant
  • Kiwi
  • Cantaloupe
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Grapefruit
  • Watermelon
  • Mushrooms

Use this list as a resource to direct you when you are buying your groceries. This is an easy way to keep your expenses down and to ensure that you are feeding your families the cleanest foods possible. Ideally, most of your foods should be purchased organic, but this list is a great resource to use if you are not ready to go all the way just yet.

If you think organic food is expensive, just think of it as an investment, so you don’t need to spend money on huge healthcare bills when you are older.

Happy Grocery Shopping!

Are you a Foodie or a Food Addict?

I love food.

I used to think that I loved food, but I did not know what that love meant until I lost over 75lbs and my relationship with food changed.

We all need food to live, but remember – food is a source of energy. We have become accepting of food-like products as real food and continue to use meals as a medium for social gatherings, which makes us happy.

Personally, I love going out to dinner with friends or having breakfast on the balcony with my wife. I am sure that most of us look forward to the evenings that we get to spend talking and enjoying the company of those closest to us and those we want to be close to. The emotions that we invest and the positive energy that we receive from these social gatherings is amazing. But I believe we (as a society) have started to use food as a supplement in the moments we crave a positive energy source, particularly in settings where we are alone, lonely and bored.

Social gatherings bring people together. People choose to spend their most precious resource, time, together. When we meet a group of friends after a long time, there is a great sense of positive energy: laughs, tears, jokes and love. This flow of positive energy is like nothing else. The same goes for romantic evenings spent with your loved one, in which you simply enjoy the company of the person you love most in the world. These are the moments we live for.

In our daily lives, many of these experiences revolve around food. Sunday brunch dates, or Saturday night get-togethers with friends tend to employ food. While we are in these situations, the company is so enjoyable that we attribute that positive energy to everything present in those moments. For example, I still remember the amazing chicken wings that we ordered when a group of friends went out to watch a baseball game in Toronto, the positive energy I felt while hanging out with my boys watching the Blue Jays win. When my wife and I were in Bruges just recently having a romantic dinner, chatting about live and our next steps, we ate the most amazing steak and mussels. Was it the company and the energy that was amazing or the food…see where I am going?

The food that we eat in our positive experiences are looked upon and thought about with such enjoyment, as though it would bring us back to that moment we enjoyed with others. These experiences, as well as negative experiences with food, contribute to how we see that food on a daily basis.

Years ago, I used to love food – or at least I thought I did. I now realize that I was using food to fill an emotional hole, a gap that I felt was missing in my life. As a teenager, I did not have a lot of friends. I did not fit into a single social group. I certainly was never the cool kid. This made me feel as though I was not good enough for my peers and that I somehow had to find a way to make friends. I used to fill this emotional hole with food. I ate everyone’s leftovers at dinner and the few friends I had were happy to hand over anything that they couldn’t finish eating in the lunchroom to me. I felt as though I was being accepted and that I was doing good, because nobody wants to waste food, especially with all those starving children in the developing world. I should simply be happy that I have food in front of me and make sure that none of it goes to waste.

I was blind to what I was doing to myself. I was addicted to food and had no idea.

In university, I was the big guy, the jolly guy that everyone liked but nobody really got to know personally. I was likeable, always smiling and always sitting in the cafeteria, ready to grab lunch, or a snack with the next person that would come sit with me while I was “studying”. I enjoyed the company so much that I ate 5 meals and 2-3 snacks per day, all processed food, all high in carbs and bad fats. This led me to Chiropractic school during which I continued this same trend as the big guy, the jolly, likeable, happy-go-lucky, book-smart guy. But I was still blind to my addiction.

I used food as the medium to fill my addiction of craving positive energy and acceptance. Unfortunately, I continue to see this trend around me, in friends, patients and family members.

Once I snapped out of the delirium and decided not to care what everyone thought or felt about me, my life changed. I met my wife, I began to grow my career, I took over a business and I became healthy.

Getting healthy is NOT about giving up the food that you think you love.

Getting healthy is about loving yourself enough, and believing that you deserve and are worth the positive energy that real food gives to each one of us. Getting healthy is about enjoying those positive experiences with friends and loved ones, with good real food, but also changing it up and going for a hike on Sunday afternoon with friends rather than another dinner on a Saturday evening. Getting healthy is about playing in a fun softball league with friends once per week. Getting healthy is about loving yourself and giving yourself the positive experiences that you deserve, even if you don’t truly know it or believe it yet. Getting healthy is about living life without excuses.

You are worth it.

You are amazing.

You are Positive Energy (1)

You are positive energy bundled into an organized blob of 60 trillion cells conspiring to keep you alive and functioning correctly, long enough to find your calling and make a positive change in the world.

Once you can say that you truly love yourself, then you are ready to say that you love food.

Cajun Oven “Fried” Chicken Wings

Cajun Oven ‘Fried’ Chicken Wings

By: Noureen Habib

I love chicken wings – anyone who knows me, knows just how much, so I thought it’d be best to learn how to make them myself without the deep-frying or breading. The trick to getting them just as good and crispy is baking them on a wire rack. That way, the fat renders evenly and consistently making them just as tasty as fried wings.

A sauce is optional; however we found we didn’t need a sauce because they turned out so moist inside and crispy on the outside!

Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2lbs of chicken wings (skin on)
  • 4 Tablespoons of my HOMEMADE CAJUN SPICE (click the link for the recipe)

Directions

  1. Marinate the chicken wings with 3 tablespoons of the Cajun spice, leave overnight
  2. Preheat the oven to 400F
  3. Line a baking tray with foil and place the wire rack on top, spread out the wings on the rack in a single layer
  4. Bake wings until they are cooked through and crispy, about 40-45 minutes
  5. Serve immediately!


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Super Easy Paleo Blondie Brownies

Anyone that knows me, knows that anything related to cake is my absolute weakness. However, cake is a great source of white carbs and processed sugars. So, I found an alternative to satisfy my sweet tooth!

These brownies are paleo, gluten free, dairy free and loaded with coconut and dark chocolate. They are made with coconut flour which is lower in carbs and has more fibre than regular white flour. Most important factor – from start to finish they took 30 minutes!

I can’t take all the credit for these, I adapted the recipe from Ambitious Kitchen!

Enjoy!

Noureen

Paleo Blondie Brownies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup melted coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup of maple syrup – the real stuff, nothing with corn syrup
  • 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk (I used the almond/coconut version)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/3 teaspoon sea salt
  • 5oz of dairy free chocolate, feel free to add/subtract based on your preference (Whole Foods has a few options, Bulk Barn has a chocolate compound)
  • 1/4 cup of coconut flakes

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F
  2. Grease a non-stick baking pan with coconut oil, I used a 7 x 11 inch baking pan
  3. In a large bowl whisk together the coconut oil, maple syrup, vanilla, eggs, and almond milk
  4. In a smaller bowl add the dry ingredients, coconut flour, baking soda and salt
  5. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until its combined and the batter is smooth. Coconut flour is super absorbent, so this step won’t take too long
  6. Fold in chocolate – I used compound chocolate chips from Whole Foods
  7. Pour into baking pan
  8. Bake for 20 minutes or until the edges are golden brown. The batter may look like its not done, because it will still be gooey, but trust it is! Coconut flour over bakes pretty easily, so ensure you take it out on time.
  9. Wait a few minutes and then score the bars into 2 x 2 pieces and take them out onto a cooling rack
  10. Use a double boiler method to melt some chocolate – drizzle this onto the bars and add the shredded coconut
  11. Cool for a few minutes or enjoy them warm – perhaps with a scoop of dairy free coconut ice cream!

No More Lunches at Your Desk!!!

We are all aware of the importance of choosing proper foods to eat. It has been drilled into our brains that we need to eat real foods and avoid the cheap, processed, high sugar “foods” that are constantly being advertised to us. Once we make this choice correctly, it is important to learn how to ensure your body can use these vital nutrients.

  1. Choose Foods Wisely

These are common sense tools that most of us know. Pick lots of vegetables, some fruits, some protein (animal or plant sources, depending on your preference) and a little unprocessed carbohydrate (vegetables often do the trick) at each meal. Once you create the meal that is real and made by you, you will truly know what has gone into it and if you are comfortable eating it. However, choosing a chicken salad over a burger and fries is only going to work if your unconscious mind is digesting the foods correctly.

  1. Be Present

One of the greatest tools that I found in my path towards optimal health, is mindfulness. Mindfulness is the ability to be present in a situation by fully experiencing the moment that you are in. It is simply the act of blocking out external stimuli and focusing deeply on the present moment and how your body is feeling and reacting in the moment.

When you bring your healthy, prepared lunch to work, many people tend to simply plop it down in front of them at their desk and quickly scarf it down while sitting in front of their computer. Others even have their dinner in front of the television while binge-watching shows on Netflix – I am guilty of this as well. By doing this, we are setting up our bodies for failure in terms of optimal digestion of our foods.

Once we give the meal our true undivided attention, it will actually taste better as we can truly experience our food – the texture, the temperature, the flavors and all the other components that make real food taste truly amazing. This allows us to enter a parasympathetic, or relaxed state of mind, a state which is essential for the body to digest foods into the bloodstream correctly.

  1. Chew Properly

When we sit down in front of the computer or with our cell phone in front of us, our attention is divided – often times we pay more attention to the screen than the food and that means that we are not chewing our food enough. When we chew our food and give it the attention in requires, we can consciously do so until the food becomes soft, and moist. This will allow our tastebuds to be correctly activated and inform the brain of the specific types of food and the taste that we are experiencing. The brain then in turn will signal the correct processes to occur – for example if our food is sweet, the brain will signal the beta cells in our pancreas to secrete Insulin, while if the food is fattier, the brain signals the liver to produce and release bile to aid in its digestion.

It is also important to chew your food sufficiently so that the acid in your stomach can properly break down food into digestible nutrients. If food is still in big chunks, your stomach will not be able to break it down sufficiently, causing decreased digestion of required vitamins, minerals and micronutrients.

One trick my wife and I have started to use, is by putting our fork down between bites and only picking it up once we have finished chewing the previous bite. Chewing your food properly not only signals to your brain the kind of food you are eating but also ensures your stomach is able to absorb the most amount of nutrients.

  1. Take your Time

Eating in a rush causes our bodies to re-enter a sympathetic fight-or-flight state, a state in which digestion is not considered an important process in the moment. It is incredibly important to take your time and chill out while having your meal.

Think of your digestion like a carwash. First you choose a reputable carwash station – someone you know and trust to do a good job. Next, when you pull up to the carwash and get your car in the proper position, you need to put your car into neutral and take your foot off the pedals. Lastly, you should take your time and enjoy the ride – like a child mesmerized by the process going on outside of the car, be present and enjoy the ride.

My mentor Dr. Sachin Patel of The Living Proof Institute has a great saying in order to optimize digestion – Choose, Chew, Chill. Choose the correct foods, chew them properly and chill while eating. Some great tips to promote your optimal health!