Getting Better Sleep

When was the last time you woke up feeling completely rested?

One of the greatest detriments to a person’s health is a poor rest and recovery routine. Getting the correct quantity and quality of sleep on a daily basis and making that into a routine can go a long way to helping with many of the health challenges that people often face. Poor sleep routines are associated with chronic pain, adrenal fatigue, hormonal imbalances, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, thyroid dysfunction, weight gain and obesity to name just a few.

Our bodies run on a natural pattern called the Circadian Rhythm. Our sleep and wake patterns are governed by our Circadian Rhythm, thus they affect our daily energy levels and motivation.

There are some steps that we can take starting immediately to improve alignment with our Circadian Rhythm, here are just a few.

  1. Fall asleep and wake up at the same time every day (yes, this includes weekends)

A routine for sleep and waking times is the best way to ensure your body finds a rhythm and sticks with it. This rhythm should mimic the rise and set of the sun as release of hormones are linked to exposure to sunlight. A good routine would be to fall asleep at 10pm and wake up at 6am, giving you 8 full hours of sleep.

  1. Get some mid-day sunlight

Exposure to sunlight governs the release of our hormones Serotonin and Melatonin. During the daytime, exposure to sunlight will increase the release of Serotonin, while in the night, decreased light leads to an increase in Melatonin release. Melatonin levels are inversely correlated to Serotonin levels – The more sun you get during the day, the better you sleep at night. Go for a nice walk during your lunch time or just take a short break with some fresh air.

  1. Eliminate exposure to screens 2 hours before bedtime

We are addicted to our cell phones, laptops, tablets, televisions and e-readers. These screens all emit light at levels increasingly approaching that of daylight. If we expose ourselves to light at such high levels right before bedtime, our Melatonin levels will not go up, making it much harder for us to fall asleep and stay asleep.

  1. Sleep in a completely dark room

Darkness at night can’t be overstated. Our bodies have evolved to sleep in complete darkness, and it is only relatively recently that we have been flooded with lights to see and do things at night. Darkness will increase Melatonin release allowing you to sleep better.

  1. Avoid excess fluid intake after 8pm

Our bladders are designed to hold a certain amount of fluid. Drinking too much water in the evening can lead to reflexes waking you at night, telling you to relieve the pressure on your bladder. If you don’t take in too much fluid at night, you won’t have the urge to wake up to relieve yourself, allowing you to stay asleep.

  1. Don’t open mail in the evening or watch the evening news

When we are flooded with news and questionable information from around the world regarding conflicts that rarely affect us directly, we turn our brains on to worry in the evening and night hours. This late day stimulation can lead to an inability to relax and decrease worry as you head to sleep.

  1. Don’t respond to email in the evening

Reserve your stimulation time and productive hours to the morning, when you are full of energy and can make decisions easily and readily. Responding to work or personal email in the evenings can be tough as it forces us to think and worry later in the evening, again keeping us from falling into a deep sleep

  1. Settle conflicts before going to bed

We’ve all heard the saying “don’t go to bed angry”. Well that is not only true for conflict resolution, but also for your sleep and wake cycle. Cut down on worry when you are heading to bed. Resolve issues so that you are not worrying about them throughout the night, while your body and mind are in recovery mode.

  1. Practice deep breathing exercises before bed to help you relax

Meditation and deep breathing can help you to clear your mind of concerns and worries before you head to sleep. I like using the app “Headspace” for a 10 minute guided meditation, however you can also choose to perform a short 20 deep breaths exercise for 5 minutes to clear your mind of thoughts and distractions.  

  1. Get a digital filter for your screen

If you use a screen (like the one you are staring at right now) a digital filter can help to eliminate much of the blue light that floods our eyes and minds. A good option is the f.lux program which you can download for free at http://justgetflux.com.

Cajun Oven “Fried” Chicken Wings

Cajun Oven ‘Fried’ Chicken Wings

By: Noureen Habib

I love chicken wings – anyone who knows me, knows just how much, so I thought it’d be best to learn how to make them myself without the deep-frying or breading. The trick to getting them just as good and crispy is baking them on a wire rack. That way, the fat renders evenly and consistently making them just as tasty as fried wings.

A sauce is optional; however we found we didn’t need a sauce because they turned out so moist inside and crispy on the outside!

Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2lbs of chicken wings (skin on)
  • 4 Tablespoons of my HOMEMADE CAJUN SPICE (click the link for the recipe)

Directions

  1. Marinate the chicken wings with 3 tablespoons of the Cajun spice, leave overnight
  2. Preheat the oven to 400F
  3. Line a baking tray with foil and place the wire rack on top, spread out the wings on the rack in a single layer
  4. Bake wings until they are cooked through and crispy, about 40-45 minutes
  5. Serve immediately!


IMG_20160108_173418

Homemade Cajun Spice

Cajun is my absolutely favourite spice mixture – I put that “s***on everything”!! Everything from salmon to chicken to steak to vegetables – honestly on EVERYTHING, it’s delicious!

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

Directions

  • Mix together in a small mason jar and use that “s*** on everything!”

Choosing Healthy Fats for Cooking

Fat has been wrongly accused. We have associated the name “fats” with unwanted body fat, but it has been proven time and time again that dietary fat doesn’t make you fat! Even more importantly, these molecules such as Omega-3 Fatty Acids are ESSENTIAL to the growth, development and maintenance of our brain, liver, heart and kidneys as an important source of nutrients.

When you are walking the aisle in the grocery store with all the oils… are you choosing the healthiest oils to cook with? Most people are misinformed as to the type of oils they should be using for different types of cooking. Let’s cut through the mess and choose correctly from now on…


Cooking on High Heat

Choose oils that are stable, that don’t oxidize or go burn easily. When oils oxidize, they form free radicals which are harmful to your cells and can damage your DNA.

COCONUT OILcoconut oil

Best for cooking at high heat.

90% of Fatty Acids in Coconut Oil are saturated, making it very resistant to high heat. It is also particularly high in Lauric Acid, a fatty acid which can improve Cholesterol and help your body to eliminate unwanted bacteria and pathogens. The fats in coconut oil can also boost your metabolism slightly and increase the feeling of fullness relative to other fats.

When choosing Coconut Oil, Virgin Coconut Oil is organic, tastes good and has powerful health benefits.


BUTTER and GHEEbutter

In the past, butter has been demonized for its high saturated fat content, but butter is actually good for you!

Margarine on the other hand, is truly awful.

REAL butter, ideally from Grass-Fed Cows contains Vitamin A, E and K2, and is rich in CLA and Butyrate fatty acids, which have powerful health benefits. CLA can lower body fat percentage in humans and Butyrate can fight inflammation, improve gut hgheeealth and has been shown to make rats completely resistant to becoming obese.

There is one caveat when cooking with butter – Regular butter DOES contain tiny amounts of Lactose and Milk Proteins that have not been clarified during the churning process. For this reason, it can burn during high heat cooking like frying… but there is a solution.

Clarified Butter or Ghee is a great option for removing all lactose sugar and proteins, leaving you with pure butterfat. Here is a great tutorial on making your own Ghee at home! DIY Ghee


 

Cooking on Lower Heat

These oils can burn when exposed to high heat, however they are quite nutritious and are not a cause for concern when cooked on lower heat levels.

OLIVE OILolive oil

Olive oil is well known for its heart healthy effects and is believed to be a key reason for the health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet.

It has been shown to raise good cholesterol (HDL) and lower the amount of oxidized bad cholesterol (LDL) that circulate in our bloodstream.

Olive oil does contain fatty acids with double bonds (more sensitive to heat), however it has been shown to be relatively resistant to lower heat levels.

Make sure to choose high quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil which contains more nutrients and antioxidants than the refined types… and it tastes so much better. A drizzle of cold Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar is often all the salad dressing you will need!

AVOCADO OILAvocado_1

The composition of Avocado Oil has been found to be very similar to Olive Oil. It can be used for many of the same purposes as Olive Oil. It can be used to cook on lower heat, or can be used cold.

 


 

 

Fats and Oils to Avoid!

CANOLA OIL

The components of Canola Oil is actually quite good overall, however theissue is that Canola Oil has a very harsh processing method to ensure the removal of Toxic Euric Acid from the Rapeseeds.

The following oils should be avoided at all costs – their processing methods are incredibly harsh, the final products are highly processed and refined and contain very high levels of inflammatory Omega-6 fatty acids. New data has been shown to link these oils with serious diseases including heart disease and cancer.

canola oilThese oils include:

  • Soybean Oil
  • Corn Oil
  • Cottonseed Oil
  • Canola Oil
  • Rapeseed Oil
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Sesame Oil
  • Grapeseed Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Rice Bran Oil

Common Vegetable Oils have also been found to contain 0.56-4.2% Trans Fats which are highly toxic. It is important to read the labels of food products and avoid these seed and industrial oils altogether.